Work For Us: Fall and Winter Internship Opportunities

If you’re studying in a degree program, and you thrive at the intersection of software development and cyber security, you should apply to our fall or winter internship programs. It’s a great way to add paid experience -and a publication- to your resume, and get a taste of what it’s like to work in a commercial infosec setting.

You’d work remotely through the fall semester or over winter break on a meaningful problem to produce or improve tools that we -Trail of Bits and the InfoSec community- need to make security better. Your work won’t culminate in a flash-in-the-pan report for an isolated problem. It will contribute to a measurable impact on modern security problems.

Two Ex-Interns Share Their Experiences

  • Sophia D’Antoine -now one of our security engineers- spent her internship working on part of what would later become MAST.
  • Evan Jensen accepted a job at MIT Lincoln Labs as a security researcher before interning for us, and still credits the experience as formative.

Why did you take this internship over others?

SD: I wasn’t determined to take a winter internship until I heard about the type of work that I could do at Trail of Bits. I’d get my own project, not just a slice of someone else’s. The chance to take responsibility for something that could have a measurable impact was very appealing. It didn’t hurt that ToB’s reputation would add some weight to my resumé.

EJ: I saw this as a chance to extend the class I took from Dan: “Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Analysis.” Coincidentally, I lined up a summer internship in the office while Dan was there. As soon as he suggested I tell my interviewer what I was working on in class, the interview ended with an offer for the position.

What did you work on during your internship?

SD: MAST’s obfuscating passes that transform the code. This wasn’t anywhere near the focus of my degree; I was studying electrical engineering. But I was playing CTFs for fun, and [ToB] liked that I was willing to teach myself. I didn’t want a project that could just be researched with Google.

EJ: I actually did two winternships at ToB. During my first, I analyzed malware that the “APT1” group was used in their intrusion campaigns. During my second, I worked on generating training material for a CTF-related DARPA grant that eventually became the material in the CTF Field Guide.

What was your experience like?

SD: It was great. I spent my entire break working on my project, and loved it. I like to have an end-goal and parameters, and the independence to research and execute. The only documentation I could find for my project was the LLVM compiler’s source code. There was no tutorial online to build an obfuscator like MAST. Beyond the technical stuff, I learned about myself, the conditions where I work best, and the types of projects that interest me most.

EJ: Working at ToB was definitely enlightening. It was the first time I actually got to use a licensed copy of IDA Pro. It was great working with other established hackers. They answered every question I could think of. I learned a lot about how to describe the challenges reverse engineers face and I picked up a few analysis tricks, too.

Why would you recommend this internship to students?

SD: So many reasons. It wasn’t a lot of little tasks. You own one big project. You start it. You finish it. You create something valuable. It’s cool paid work. It’s intellectually rewarding. You learn a lot. ToB is one of the best companies to have on your resume; it’s great networking.

EJ: People will never stop asking you about Trail of Bits.

Here’s What You Might Work On

We always have a variety of projects going on, and tools that could be honed. Your project will be an offshoot of our work, such as:

  • Our Cyber Reasoning System (CRS) -which we developed for the Cyber Grand Challenge and currently used for paid engagements- has potential to do a lot more. This is a really complicated distributed system with a multitude of open source components at play, including symbolic executors, x86 lifting, dynamic binary translation, and more.
  • PointsTo, an LLVM-based static analysis that discovers object life-cycle (e.g. use-after-free) vulnerabilities in large software projects such as web browsers and network servers. Learn more.
  • McSema, an open-source framework that performs static translation of x86 and x86-64 binaries to the LLVM intermediate representation. McSema enables existing LLVM-based program analysis tools to operate on binary code. See the code.
  • MAST, a collection of several whole-program transformations using the LLVM compiler infrastructure as a platform for iOS software obfuscation and protection.

In general, you’ll make a meaningful contribution to the development of reverse engineering and software analysis tools. Not many places promise that kind of work to interns, nor pay for it.

Interested?

You must have experience with software development. We want you to help us refine tools that find and fix problems for good, not just for a one-time report. Show us code that you’ve written, examples on GitHub, or CTF write-ups you’ve published.

You must be motivated. You’ll start with a clear project and an identified goal. How you get there is up to you. Apart from in-person kick-off and debrief meetings in our Manhattan offices, you will work remotely.

But you won’t be alone. We take advantage of all the latest technology to get work done, including platforms like Slack, Github, Trello and Hangouts. You’ll find considerable expertise available to you. We’ll do our best to organize everything we can up front so that you’re positioned for success. We will make good use of your time and effort.

If you’re headed into the public sector -maybe you took a Scholarship For Service- you may be wondering what it’s like to work in a commercial firm. If you want some industry experience before getting absorbed into a government agency, intern with us.

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