Analyzing the MD5 collision in Flame

One of the more interesting aspects of the Flame malware was the MD5 collision attack that was used to infect new machines through Windows Update. MD5 collisions are not new, but this is the first attack discovered in the wild and deserves a more in-depth look. Trail of Bits is uniquely qualified to perform this analysis, because our co-founder Alex Sotirov was one of the members in the academic collaboration that first demonstrated the practicality of this class of attacks in 2008. Our preliminary findings were presented on June 9th at the SummerCon conference in New York and are available online or as a PDF download.

Pwn2Own Pre-Game

Just in time to get warmed up for Pwn2Own, we are delivering a joint offering of the training courses “Bug Hunting and Analysis 0x65” by Aaron Portnoy and Zef Cekaj as well as “Assured Exploitation” by Dino Dai Zovi and Alex Sotirov in New York City on January 31 – February 3. Students may take either course or both classes for a $1000 discount. Full course information is available in the Pwn2Own PreGame PDF or the full blog post after the jump.

[Read more...]

iOS 4 Security Evaluation

This year’s BlackHat USA was the 12th year in a row that I’ve attended and the 6th year in a row that I’ve participated in as a presenter, trainer, and/or co-organizer/host of the Pwnie Awards. And I made this year my busiest yet by delivering four days of training, a presentation, the Pwnie Awards, and participating on a panel. Not only does that mean that I slip into a coma after BlackHat, it also means that I win at conference bingo.

Reading my excuses for the delay in posting my slides and whitepaper, however, is not why you are reading this blog post. It is to find the link to download said slides and whitepaper:

Attacker Math 101

At SOURCE Boston this year, I gave my first conference keynote presentation. I really appreciate the opportunity that Stacy Thayer and the rest of the SOURCE crew gave me. The presentation was filmed by AT&T and you can watch it on the AT&T Tech Channel. Another thanks goes out to Ryan Naraine for inviting me to give an encore presentation of it for Kaspersky’s SAS conference in Malaga, Spain.

If slides are more your style, you can check out the more recent version from Kaspersky’s SAS 2011: Attacker Math 101.

NYC Assured Exploitation Training

On June 8-9, right before SummerC0n, Alex Sotirov and I will be giving a special New York City edition of our Assured Exploitation training class. This is a great opportunity for anyone who was unable to take our class at CanSecWest this year. The two-day class costs $2500 per student for registrations received before May 25 and $3000 per student for registrations received afterwards.  We accept payment via Purchase Order, major credit cards, and PayPal.  Group discounts are also available (contact us for a price quote).  To register, e-mail me (ddz at theta44 dot org) or fill out the form below.  For full details, see below or download the full course description.

UPDATE: A location has been selected for the training (1 New York Plaza in lower Manhattan).

[Read more...]

Upcoming Events in 2011

I’m going to start out 2011 pretty busy on the information security events circuit.  Here are some of the events that I’ll be participating in over the first few months in 2011:

So there you have it: a workshop, a presentation, a round-table, a panel, a training, and a keynote on both coasts of North America and both sides of the Atlantic.  I win at conference bingo!  I’m pretty excited about giving my first ever conference keynote presentation at SOURCE.  I’ll be giving a food-for-thought type of presentation, not the technical sort that I’m used to.  However, just to keep things interesting, I might randomly drop some 0day in the middle of the presentation anyway.

Hacking at Mach 2!

At BayThreat last month, I gave an updated (and more much sober) version of my “Hacking at Mach Speed” presentation from SummerC0n.  Now, since the 0day Mach RPC privilege de-escalation vulnerability has been fixed, I can include full details on it.  The presentation is meant to give a walkthrough on how to identify and enumerate Mach RPC interfaces in bootstrap servers on Mac OS X.  Why would you want to do this?  Hint: there are other uses for these types of vulnerabilities besides gaining increased privileges on single-user Mac desktops.  Enjoy!

  • “Hacking at Mach 2!” (PDF)

Memory Corruption, Exploitation, and You

At the NY/NJ OWASP meeting last week, I gave an experimental high-level (i.e. not really technical) talk that I call “Memory Corruption, Exploitation, and You.” The talk is essentially a few rants stapled together, all relating to exploits, but also trying to predict where attackers in the wild will be headed in the next couple of years. One of the points that I tried to make (and will be trying to make in upcoming talks as well) is that the threat environment has changed from what I call “getting hacked by accident” (non-targeted mass malware attacks) to an increased prevalence and awareness of targeted attacks in the wild, often using 0day vulns/exploits and custom malware. Responding to this requires changing several aspects of our mindset about network defense and vulnerability handling.

I gave an earlier version of the talk at BSidesSF (video here) and here are the updated slides that I gave at OWASP.

KARMA Demo on the CBS Early Show

Although I haven’t done any development on KARMA for a little over 5 years at this point, many of the weaknesses that it demonstrates are still very present, especially with the proliferation of open 802.11 Hotspots in public places. A few weeks ago, I was invited to help prepare a demo of KARMA for CBS News and the segment actually aired a few weeks ago. If you’re like me and don’t have one of those old-fashioned tele-ma-vision boxes, you can check out the segment here.

Unfortunately, they weren’t able to use the full demo that I prepared. The full demo used a KARMA promiscuous access point to lure clients onto my rogue wireless network with a rogue network’s gateway routed outbound HTTP traffic through a transparent proxy that injected IFRAMEs in each HTML page. The IFRAMEs loaded my own custom “Aurora” exploit, which injected Metasploit’s Meterpreter into the running web browser. From there, I could use the Meterpreter to sniff keystrokes as they logged into their SSL-protected bank/e-mail/whatever. The point was that even if a victim only uses the open Wi-Fi network to log into the captive portal webpage, that’s enough for a nearby attacker to exploit their web browser and maintain control over their system going forward. Perhaps that was a little too complicated for a news segment that the average American watches over breakfast.

As it has been quite a while since I have talked about KARMA, here are a few updates on the weaknesses that it demonstrated:

  • Windows XP SP2 systems with 802.11b-only wireless cards would “park” the cards when the user is not associated to a wireless network by assigning them a 32-character random desired SSID. Even if the user had no networks in their Preferred Networks List, the laptop would associate to a KARMA Promiscuous Access Point and activate the network stack while the GUI would still show the user as not currently associated to any network. This issue was an artifact of 802.11b-only card firmwares (PrismII and Orinoco were affected) and is not present on most 802.11g cards, which is what everyone has these days anyway.
  • Even with a newer card, Windows XP SP2 will broadcast the contents of its Preferred Networks List in Probe Request frames every 60 seconds until it joins a network. Revealing the contents of the PNL allows an attacker to create a network with that name or use a promiscuous access point to lure the client onto their rogue network. Windows Vista and XP SP3 fixed this behavior.
  • Mac OS X had the same two behaviors, except that Apple’s AirPort driver would enable WEP on the wireless card when it had “parked” it. However, the WEP key was a static 40-bit key (0x0102030405 if I recall). Apple issued a security update in July 2005 and credited me for reporting the issue.
  • On 10/17/2006, Microsoft released a hotfix to fix both of the previous issues on Windows XP SP2 systems that Shane Macaulay and I had discovered and presented at various security conferences over the previous two years.
  • Newer versions of Windows (XP SP3, Vista, 7) are only affected if the user manually selects to join the rogue wireless network or the rogue network beacons an SSID in the user’s Preferred Networks List.

Although the leading desktop operating systems found on most laptops have addressed the issue, most mobile phones now support 802.11 Wi-Fi, which may give KARMA a chance to live again!

BlackHat USA 2010

BlackHat is going to be a busy one for me this year because I am still trying to quit my nasty over-committing habit. But hopefully, I should have something that interests just about everybody.

If you love/hate Macs and like hacking, you should check out the Mac Hacking Class training that I am giving with Vincenzo Iozzo. We’ll be covering a lot of material including discovering and exploiting vulnerabilities, Mac OS X and Mach internals, and writing exploit payloads.

If Windows is more your style, you should check out my presentation, Return-Oriented Exploitation. I’ll be talking about using a variety of return-oriented techniques to bypass DEP/NX and ASLR on modern Windows operating systems, using my exploit for the “Operation Aurora” Internet Explorer vulnerability as an example and live demo. My presentation will be on Thursday at 1:45pm in the Exploitation Track (Augustus 1-2).

Finally, if you don’t really care about Macs or Windows, but do love security vulnerabilities and/or the infosec drama circus (b/c who really cares about the actual work we do?), you should check out the Pwnie Awards. For the 4th year in a row, Alex Sotirov and I have organized the Pwnie Awards to celebrate the achievements and failures of the information security industry. Along with our fellow esteemed judges (Dave Aitel, Mark Dowd, Halvar Flake, Dave Goldsmith, and HD Moore), we will be hosting the Pwnie Awards at 6:00pm on Wednesday, July 28th or July 29th (there seems to be some confusion on exactly which day it’ll be on and where currently). Follow the Pwnie Awards on Twitter for late-breaking updates.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,631 other followers